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a PhD in live projects and architectural education

Field Clegg Bradley to design £250m UU city centre campus

A landmark development for Belfast City Centre, announced in today’s BD

Feilden Clegg Bradley wins biggest ever job
28 January 2011 | By David Rogers

Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios has landed the biggest scheme in its history after wrapping up a £250 million deal to design a university campus in Northern Ireland.

The job, for Ulster University, is three times bigger than the 33-year-old firm’s previous largest, the £80 million Accordia development which in 2008 became the first housing scheme to win the Stirling Prize.

The university is moving the majority of its out-of-town campus onto a site known as the Cathedral Quarter in the middle of Belfast, and wants it to open in time for the start of the academic year in 2018. The rundown space earmarked for the 80,000sq m development is currently occupied by a car park and office blocks.

Such is the scale of the project that the practice plans to open a permanent office in Belfast to cope with the work. Senior partner Keith Bradley said: “We told the university we would open an office in Belfast and we’re hoping to do that by early summer.”

Bradley said up to 20 staff at the office – its third after Bath and London – would work on the project, and he expects the firm, which currently employs around 140 staff, to begin recruiting later this year.

Ulster University vice-chancellor Richard Barnett said: “The plan will transform the Cathedral Quarter and surrounding areas into a dynamic educational, cultural and creative destination.”

Continues: http://www.bdonline.co.uk/news/feilden-clegg-bradley-wins-biggest-ever-job/5012391.article

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PhD opportunities at Sonic Arts Research Centre, QUB

Interested in music and fancy doing a PhD at Queen’s? The Sonic Arts Research Centre are accepting applications for entry in the 2011/12 academic year until 1 March 2011 in the fields of Musicology, Composition & Creative Practice, Sonic Arts (info here). You will also get to work in one of coolest buildings in Belfast, SARC’s awesome Sonic Lab (specs) that’s pictured above.

If you’ve already started a PhD in that area elsewhere (and are maybe experiencing Sound Lab jealousy), don’t feel left out. The following call may also be of interest.

CALL FOR APPLICATIONS

The Sonic Arts Research Centre (SARC) is calling for applications from doctoral students (at any stage of their research) with a music/sonic arts/performance background, in particular from those researchers with an interest in new technologies.

The course BIG EARS sonic art for public earsʼ runs from 14 – 16 April 2011 and will deliver training in communication skills, public engagement and will offer hands-on experiences for researchers in linking with an audience facilitated by Northern Ireland’s leading children’s arts organisation, Young at Art www.youngatart.co.uk.

On the final day (16 April 2011) PhD researchers will work closely with local children and will showcase the outcomes ! that were designed during the course. The showcase will be a public event to be staged at SARC, a cutting-edge space, geared towards new technological developments.

To apply for a place in the three day course please click here and fill out the application form or contact Franziska Schroederf.schroeder@qub.ac.uk for more information. Candidates are required to submit a 500 word statement and two references, the deadline for applications is 25 January 2011.

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Street Society 2011: call for proposals

In addition to the forthcoming Live Projects 2011 colloquium (of which you’re probably bored of reading by now), Belfast readers from within and outwith the architectural community may be interested to hear about the ongoing call for participation in the 2011 Street Society 2011 (pdf, text below). This will be the second year we’ve run this one week vertical live project between our first and fifth year students of architecture. We’re on the lookout for potential clients (community groups, organisations, charities etc) who would be interested in working with our students for one week in March.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS:
the Street Society is a one- week design research office.

It brings together first year students from both the undergraduate BSc Architecture and the Masters in Architecture course in the School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering at QUB, to work on a range of projects for clients.

It will run between Monday 7th and Friday 11th March 2011.

The Street Society is now looking for potential clients – external organisations, architects, built environment professionals, community organizations, charitable bodies etc. Potential clients will have a question that architectural students can help to answer; a design problem; a site to evaluate; a building, material, or construction process to investigate, document, or better understand.

Possible projects might include:

  • design proposals
  • consultations
  • exhibitions
  • installations
  • historical / theoretical research
  • research piloting
  • temporary constructions
  • material exploration
  • curated spatial events
  • post-occupancy evaluations

The Street society will be made up of 10-12 groups with a mix of undergraduate and postgraduate students in each. The postgraduate students will act as project managers and as contacts for each client.
If you are interested in submitting a project proposal for one of the offices of The Street Society please forward a 300 word description to:

…no later than 12.00 midday, Wednesday 2 February 2011.

Project submissions will be reviewed and accepted on the basis of an overall coherence within the Street Society programme / aims and in terms of achievability of outcome within the five day time frame.

Applicants will be notified of their inclusion no later than Friday 11 February, and should be available to attend preparatory meetings and consultations on Friday 4 March.

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Live Projects 2011

Just a reminder, the deadline for abstracts for Live Projects 2011 – a free, one day colloquium for live project academics in architecture, built environment and design disciplines – is today, 21 January. Head to liveprojects2011.wordpress.com for details on how to submit. There is no registration fee, and those chosen to participate will have reasonable travel and accommodation expenses met.

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This thesis isn’t going to write itself

But with less than 140 characters to play with, my tweets surely will.

twitter.com/jbenedictbrown

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Snapshot: Common Grounds 2011

More photos on Flickr.

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Collage: Common Grounds 2011 notes

Anna Holder uploaded this collage (via her Flickr) of our big-paper-brain-dump at Common Grounds 2011. It’s been good to hear from some of the Common Grounds participants over the past few days, especially as the discussions around architectural research and spatial practices are teased out, perhaps towards more tangible outputs.

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AHRA 2011: Peripheries – call for papers

Save the dates, and we hope to welcome you to Belfast in October.

Call for Papers

PERIPHERIES
27-29 October 2011

Architectural Humanities Research Association Conference 2011
School of Planning, Architecture & Civil Engineering (SPACE)
Queen’s University Belfast

Peripheries are increasingly considered in contemporary culture, research and practice. This shift in focus challenges the idea that the centre primarily influences the periphery, giving way to an understanding of reciprocal influences. These principles have permeated into a wide range of areas of study and practice, transforming the way we approach research and spatio-temporal relations.

The 2011 AHRA Queen’s Belfast Peripheries conference will invite discussion via papers and short films on the multiple aspects periphery represents — temporal, spatial, intellectual, technological, cultural, pedagogical and political – with, as a foundation for development, the following themes:

  • Peripheral practices
  • Practice-based research
  • Urban peripheries
  • Non-metropolitan contexts
  • Peripheral positions

From these themes might arise a series of questions:

  • How do notions of periphery and proximity impact on the construction of cultural memory?
  • Is globalization facilitating the inclusiveness of peripheries or denying their local value to favour the centre?
  • How does architecture respond to the challenges of temporal peripheries in varying historical, spatial and political contexts
  • Does being on the edge heighten or transform architectural practice?
  • What infrastructure is required for peripheral positions to exist? How are peripheries networked to one another and to centres?
  • Can architecture support peripheral populations, and can these voices offer critique of architectural practice?
  • How does interdisciplinarity — the communication between perceived peripheral disciplines — affect architectural practice?
  • What are the shifting boundaries of alternative or peripheral currents of education, research and practice? Do architecture schools recognize the importance of peripheral subjects in their teaching?

Queen’s University’s School of Planning Architecture and Civil Engineering operates within a context of an increasingly non-metropolitan society, on an island of rural communities resistant to normative patterns of urbanisation. The culture, economies, politics and social networks in Ireland are often perceived as “on the edge of Europe”; it is a place of experimentation, translation and evolution.

Belfast is thus an ideal setting in which to pose questions of periphery: it is a city in simultaneous states of flux with multiple political and social reiterations and repositionings. In a city where extremism was once the norm, there is much to ask about how to moderate and manage the tensions and potentials that exist between the edge and the centre.

Timetable

  • abstracts of papers (500 words) and digital video (5-8 minutes in length:) 15 February 2011
  • notification of acceptance: 15 April 2011
  • registration open: 1 June 2011
  • submission of summary paper based on abstract (1000-2000 words) or film: 1 August 2011
  • categories/sessions determined and session chairs chosen: 1 September 2011
  • chairs of sessions distribute expanded abstracts/films to co-session paper presenters; all chairs and paper presenters asked to provide structured feedback/reflection on session papers: 1 October 2011

Submissions and registration via conference website: http://www.qub.ac.uk/peripheries2011

Contact peripheries@qub.ac.uk with any questions.

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Common Grounds 2011: four days to go

I’m very excited to that Common Grounds: exploring methodologies for research within or research about architecture and the built environment is very nearly upon us.

Last year Anna Holder and I caught up at symposium in Manchester and bemoaned the trials and tribulations of all matters methodological in our PhD studies. So we decided to do something about it that would be proactive and fun. The result is this, a two day winter colloquium for post-graduate students and early career researchers on methodologies for researching architecture and the built environment. It’ll be happeningin the Anwyl Room at St. Deiniolʼs Library, Clwyd on Friday 14 & Saturday 15 January 2011. Common Grounds proposes a weekend away from the university to present, discuss and constructively critique research-in-progress.

The intent of Common Grounds is to nurture an informal student-led research colloquium dedicated to that most tricky aspect of research: method. It’s been our experience of architectural education that too many students of architecture avoid or consciously postpone any engagement of technical, structural or detailed design in their studio projects. It’s a fear of the unknown, the hard-to-grasp unknown skills that are best learnt through real experience. In our PhDs, we’ve had precious little structured introduction or discussion of actual research method and methodology.

The deadline for abstracts is long gone, but perhaps if you missed it or haven’t found out about the event until now, there might be a chance we can squeeze you in. Head to the Common Grounds webpage and drop us an email. Accommodation at the library is now limited, but we hope we can see you there.

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About the project

learning architecture is an academic blog of James Benedict Brown, previously a doctoral candidate in architectural pedagogy at the School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering at Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland. James passed his viva in September 2012 and graduated the following December.


About the author

James Benedict Brown has worked and studied in England, Northern Ireland, France and Canada. Following the completion of his PhD at QUB, he was appointed Lecturer in Architecture at Norwich University of the Arts. A short bio is here.


About the supervisors

The project is supervised by Prof. Ruth Morrow and Keith McAllister. Prior to his appointment at Qatar University in 2009, Prof. Ashraf Salama also supervised the project.


Bibliography

Click here for the bibliography to date.


Words

Click here for a selection of peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed writing.


Glossary

Click here for a glossary-in-progress of key terms used in the project.


Conference diary

Conferences and seminars of interest to the project.


Note

All images are used for illustrative purposes only, and the copyright remains with the artist and/or creator. Please contact me if I have misappropriated an image or incorrectly credited it.


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